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CurrentEuropeIslamophobia

More than 10,000 march in Paris against the rise of Islamophobia in France

CurrentEuropeIslamophobia

More than 10,000 march in Paris against the rise of Islamophobia in France

As French Muslims continue to demonstrate and fight for their right of the freedom of expression, many have seen this peaceful demonstration, which saw many French Muslims hoisting French flags, as a sign that it is the government, and not French Muslims, who are headbutting against true French values.

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This Sunday saw more than 10,000 people march through the otherwise quaint streets of Paris, protesting against the growing rise of Islamophobia and discrimination against Muslims in France. This comes only two weeks after the mosque shooting in the southern city of Bayonne, when an elderly Frenchman shot and injured Muslim worshippers at a mosque.

Although heavily criticized by numerous French and other news-outlets as being Salafi-backed or supporting religious extremism, this widespread demonstration, which saw similar marches in the city of Marseilles as well, was a strong attempt at demonstrating their right, as French citizens, to openly practice whatever faith they believe in.

Muslim women in France are protesting the controversial “burkini ban”

Others criticized the demonstration as being supposedly anti-secularist, with the state secretary in charge of fighting discrimination, Marlene Schiappa, calling this historic march a protest against secularism “under the guise of combating discrimination”. To counter this, many demonstrators held signs that read:

Yes to criticism of religion, no to hate against the faithful.

According to a survey conducted earlier this month by Ifop, more than 40% of Muslims in France feel they have experienced religious discrimination, despite Islam being the second biggest religion in the country. And despite calls for liberty, equality, and fraternity, France’s harsh discrimination against those who wear the hijab, or show any outward sign of religion, can be seen as a direct challenge of what the true meaning of liberty and equality are.

Hatred is not equality: The rise of Islamophobia in France

As French Muslims continue to demonstrate and fight for their right of the freedom of expression, many have seen this peaceful demonstration, which saw many French Muslims hoisting French flags, as a sign that it is the government, and not French Muslims, who are headbutting against true French values.

Whilst you’re here…

The Muslim Vibe is a non-profit media platform aiming to inspire, inform and empower Muslims like you. Our goal is to provide a space for young Muslims to learn about their faith as well as news stories affecting them, so we can reclaim the Muslim narrative from the mainstream.

Your support will help us achieve this goal, and enable us to produce more original content. Your support can help us in the fight against Islamophobia, by building a powerful platform for young Muslims who can share their ideas, experiences and opinions for a better future.

Please consider supporting The Muslim Vibe, from as little as £1 – it will only take a minute. Thank you and Jazakallah.

Keep Reading

As French Muslims continue to demonstrate and fight for their right of the freedom of expression, many have seen this peaceful demonstration, which saw many French Muslims hoisting French flags, as a sign that it is the government, and not French Muslims, who are headbutting against true French values.

This Sunday saw more than 10,000 people march through the otherwise quaint streets of Paris, protesting against the growing rise of Islamophobia and discrimination against Muslims in France. This comes only two weeks after the mosque shooting in the southern city of Bayonne, when an elderly Frenchman shot and injured Muslim worshippers at a mosque.

Although heavily criticized by numerous French and other news-outlets as being Salafi-backed or supporting religious extremism, this widespread demonstration, which saw similar marches in the city of Marseilles as well, was a strong attempt at demonstrating their right, as French citizens, to openly practice whatever faith they believe in.

Muslim women in France are protesting the controversial “burkini ban”

Others criticized the demonstration as being supposedly anti-secularist, with the state secretary in charge of fighting discrimination, Marlene Schiappa, calling this historic march a protest against secularism “under the guise of combating discrimination”. To counter this, many demonstrators held signs that read:

Yes to criticism of religion, no to hate against the faithful.

According to a survey conducted earlier this month by Ifop, more than 40% of Muslims in France feel they have experienced religious discrimination, despite Islam being the second biggest religion in the country. And despite calls for liberty, equality, and fraternity, France’s harsh discrimination against those who wear the hijab, or show any outward sign of religion, can be seen as a direct challenge of what the true meaning of liberty and equality are.

Hatred is not equality: The rise of Islamophobia in France

As French Muslims continue to demonstrate and fight for their right of the freedom of expression, many have seen this peaceful demonstration, which saw many French Muslims hoisting French flags, as a sign that it is the government, and not French Muslims, who are headbutting against true French values.

Whilst you’re here…

The Muslim Vibe is a non-profit media platform aiming to inspire, inform and empower Muslims like you. Our goal is to provide a space for young Muslims to learn about their faith as well as news stories affecting them, so we can reclaim the Muslim narrative from the mainstream.

Your support will help us achieve this goal, and enable us to produce more original content. Your support can help us in the fight against Islamophobia, by building a powerful platform for young Muslims who can share their ideas, experiences and opinions for a better future.

Please consider supporting The Muslim Vibe, from as little as £1 – it will only take a minute. Thank you and Jazakallah.

Keep Reading

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